2005 YU55 close flyby

Observation of 2005 YU55 at ISON-NM Observatory will be started on Nov. 09, 01:30 UT. Stay tuned!

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Observation of optical transients now and in real time

NASA

This week at our observatory a program of automatic observations of optical transients began. Receiving notice of a gamma ray burst, the telescope automatically goes to the object and takes a series of images. This way, any ongoing observation program comes to a halt with the interruption of the exposure.

The first observation of a gamma ray burst in full automatic mode took place October 29. Our telescope began observations of the event just 77 seconds after receiving an urgent message about the gamma ray burst (alert). Unfortunately, this time it was not possible to detect the afterglow, but the best is still ahead!

In addition, in automatic mode we were able to conduct automatic observations of optical transients posted on the Transient Objects Confirmation Page – TOCP. At the moment two supernovas have already been confirmed.

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One night at ISON-NM Observatory

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New all-sky camera installed at the observatory

ISON-NM Observatory

A new high sensitivity survey camera with a 360 degree field of view has been installed at our observatory. Using it, we plan to conduct observations of meteors, bright comets and studies of bright variable stars. in 60 second exposures the camera can reach 8th magnitude, and thousands of stars are visible on the images. In addition, the camera will be used to observe the weather above the observatory and mapping cloud cover.

Images from the camera will be published here, updating every 5 minutes. At the observatory all the images will be preserved individually in FITS format, which allows for the possibility of future processing.

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The cloud of fragments remaining from comet Elenin has been detected

Rolando Ligustri

After many attempts to find any remains of Comet Elenin, they have been located. The first message came from Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero, and Nick Howes. On their images, a small extended cloud with low surface brightness was visible. This cloud is easily seen on Ronald Ligustri’s image which can be seen at left. During the night of October 21-22 at our observatory we also made followup observations of the comet, and the motion of the cloud was confirmed. You can see the animation here. The Moon is leaving, and the comet is climbing higher in the northern sky. I think, in the near future new images will be obtained of this object, once known as Comet Elenin.

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